vrijdag 4 april 2014

Jacques Thibaud 2: Bach vioolconcert (HMV, 1924)


Een tweede post van de Franse violist Jacques Thibaud (27.09.1880 - 01.09.1953) met het vioolconcert van Bach in E BWV 1042. De dirigent staat niet op de labels vermeld, maar is volgens de CHARM database R. Orthman.

Giovanni Antonio Piani (Napels, 1678 - Wenen, 1760): Italiaans componist en violist. Zijn vader was trompettist aan het hof van Napels. Studeerde viool aan het Conservatorio della Pièta dei Turchini. Was tot 1702 admiraal van de Franse vloot in Toulouse. Werkte in Wenen en van 1704-1721 in Parijs, waar hij in dienst was van Louis-Alexandre de Bourbon en zijn naam verfranste in Jean-Antoine Desplanes. Van 1721-1760 was hij verbonden aan het hoforkest in Wenen, vanaf 1741 als muziekdirecteur.

Dankzij Jolyon kunnen we een recensie lezen, geplaatst in the Gramophone van september 1925:


Peter Latham’s review in The Gramophone of September 1925:

BACH'S VIOLIN CONCERTO IN E MAJOR H.M.V - D.B.789-91 (three 12in. records, 8s. 6d. each).-Jacques Thibaud (violin), with orch. acc.: Concerto in E major < B H hi, five sides, and Intrada -Adagio (Desplanes, arr. Nachez), one side.
This concerto was probably written during the period (1717-23) when Bach was Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cothen. His duties during this time were connected with the Court rather than the Church, and we find him in consequence turning from cantatas and organ pieces to the secular forms of music and writing the French suites, the first half of the “forty-eight," the Brandenberg Concertos, and many other things, besides the delightful work before us here.
The orchestration of the concerto is exceedingly simple, the solo violin being accompanied only by a string band. Occasion- ally, indeed, Bach has not even bothered to write in the middle parts, contenting himself with the music for the solo instrument and the bass and leaving the rest to be supplied by the " continuo." Nowadays these middle parts are usually played by the strings, and this is certainly the most satisfactory plan ; but the term “ continuo " in the score referred to the part of the conductor, as we should now call him. It often consisted only of the melody and a figured bass from which ho would fill in the gaps in the orchestral harmony extempore on the harpsichord or some other keyboard instrument.
The first movement occupies two sides, though musically it falls into three main sections. The compact principal subject, with its two contrasted phrases, is contained in the two opening bars, and the first two-thirds of the side are concerned with the full exposition of this material and some appropriate digressions. 'Die second main section is in the nature of a development and takes us to about a third of the way through side two, the remainder of this side being an exact repetition of the first section.
While this movement suggests strength and buoyancy, the second is one of the most lovely reveries in which Bach ever indulged. The rhythmic subject given out by the lower strings at the start is continued all through in various shapes and keys, only resting now and then for a few bars to allow the 'cellos to breathe, as it were. It is this bass that binds the movement together ; above it the soloist may safely trace his tireless series of expressive arabesques without any fear of the listener losing his bearings. The movement occupies two sides.
A single side suffices for the Finale. In form this is a Rondo, the tune at the beginning being repeated at intervals and the gaps filled by various episodes. In spirit it has that exhilarating combination of merriment, sanity, and strength which is the hall- mark of John Sebastian in his lighter moods.
Thibaud is, I think, most successful in the first movement. In the second he is a little inclined to be sentimental at the expense of the rhythm, and ho takes the Finale rather slowly for my taste, though here his rhythm is splendidly firm. The recording has caught his tone admirably and the reproduction of the lower strings is good, though I feel we might with advantage hear more of the orchestral violins ; in the places where Thibaud is playing their modesty is somewhat excessive. There is, by the way something seriously wrong with the bass part at the conclusion of the second movement (end of side four) in my pressing ; but perhaps I have been unlucky.
The piece on the odd side would come appropriately enough before the Concerto and is well played and recorded.



Johann Sebastian Bach: Vioolconcert in E BWV 1042    18:23

1  allegro    8:36
2  adagio    6:53
3  allegro assai    2:54
Jacques Thibaud, viool; orkest o.l.v. R. Orthman
HMV DB 789-791  (4-07924~8)   Cc5267-2; 5268-2; 5269-3
Opname Londen, 21-10-1924 (kant 1); 31-10-1924 (kant 2+3)

4  Jean-Antoine Desplanes, arr. Nachéz: Intrada - adagio    2:52
Jacques Thibaud, viool; Madame Adams, pi.
HMV DB 791   (4-07929)   Cc5312-1
Opname Londen, 31-10-1924

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3 opmerkingen:

  1. Thank you, Satyr! I have different data for the Desplanes piece; according to Alan Kelly, it was recorded 31 October 1924 (as were the last two sides of the Concerto), and the pianist wasn't Craxton, but HMV's house accompanist Madame Adami.

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    Reacties
    1. Thanks Bryan! so the CHARM database has some mistakes... I'll correct the data! Greetz, Satyr / Rolf

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  2. Many thanks Satyr

    Thought you might like to read Peter Latham’s review in The Gramophone of September 1925

    best wishes

    Jolyon

    BACH'S VIOLIN CONCERTO IN E MAJOR H.M.V - D.B.789-91 (three 12in. records, 8s. 6d. each).-Jacques Thibaud (violin), with orch. acc.: Concerto in E major < B H hi, five sides, and Intrada -Adagio (Desplanes, arr. Nachez), one side.
    This concerto was probably written during the period (1717-23) when Bach was Kapellmeister to Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cothen. His duties during this time were connected with the Court rather than the Church, and we find him in consequence turning from cantatas and organ pieces to the secular forms of music and writing the French suites, the first half of the “forty-eight," the Brandenberg Concertos, and many other things, besides the delightful work before us here.
    The orchestration of the concerto is exceedingly simple, the solo violin being accompanied only by a string band. Occasion- ally, indeed, Bach has not even bothered to write in the middle parts, contenting himself with the music for the solo instrument and the bass and leaving the rest to be supplied by the " continuo." Nowadays these middle parts are usually played by the strings, and this is certainly the most satisfactory plan ; but the term “ continuo " in the score referred to the part of the conductor, as we should now call him. It often consisted only of the melody and a figured bass from which ho would fill in the gaps in the orchestral harmony extempore on the harpsichord or some other keyboard instrument.
    The first movement occupies two sides, though musically it falls into three main sections. The compact principal subject, with its two contrasted phrases, is contained in the two opening bars, and the first two-thirds of the side are concerned with the full exposition of this material and some appropriate digressions. 'Die second main section is in the nature of a development and takes us to about a third of the way through side two, the remainder of this side being an exact repetition of the first section.
    While this movement suggests strength and buoyancy, the second is one of the most lovely reveries in which Bach ever indulged. The rhythmic subject given out by the lower strings at the start is continued all through in various shapes and keys, only resting now and then for a few bars to allow the 'cellos to breathe, as it were. It is this bass that binds the movement together ; above it the soloist may safely trace his tireless series of expressive arabesques without any fear of the listener losing his bearings. The movement occupies two sides.
    A single side suffices for the Finale. In form this is a Rondo, the tune at the beginning being repeated at intervals and the gaps filled by various episodes. In spirit it has that exhilarating combination of merriment, sanity, and strength which is the hall- mark of John Sebastian in his lighter moods.
    Thibaud is, I think, most successful in the first movement. In the second he is a little inclined to be sentimental at the expense of the rhythm, and ho takes the Finale rather slowly for my taste, though here his rhythm is splendidly firm. The recording has caught his tone admirably and the reproduction of the lower strings is good, though I feel we might with advantage hear more of the orchestral violins ; in the places where Thibaud is playing their modesty is somewhat excessive. There is, by the way something seriously wrong with the bass part at the conclusion of the second movement (end of side four) in my pressing ; but perhaps I have been unlucky.
    The piece on the odd side would come appropriately enough before the Concerto and is well played and recorded.

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